Lee, Sabrina, PhD

Information

Name

Lee, Sabrina, PhD

Title

Assistant Professor

Email

s-lee@northwestern.edu

Office Phone

312-503-4564

Department

Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences

Office

645 N Michigan Ave, Suite 1100

Website

http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/sites/pthms/research/faculty-research/muscle-biomechanics.html

Areas of Research

Movement & Rehabilitation

Training Grants

Training in the Neurobiology of Movement and Rehabilitation Sciences

Current Research

Current Research

The primary research focus of my research is to determine the underlying mechanisms that contribute to impaired movement in indivduals with neurological impairments such as stroke, cerebral palsy, or spinal cord injury. Using a variety of techniques such as ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, modeling, histochemistry, electromyography, and gait analysis, we can begin to eludicate the complex nature of altered movement. Specifically, I am interested in changes in musculoskeletal architecture, muscle material properties and composition, as well as recruitment patterns of different motor unit types. Knowing the influence of these changes on impaired movement will form the basis for proposing clinical tools used to aid in diagnosing and assessment and for developing novel interventions for rehabilitation.

Selected Publications

Selected Publications

1. Lee, S.S.M., Speer, S., Rymer, W.Z. (2015) Quantifying Changes In Material Properties Of Stroke-Impaired Muscle. Clinical Biomechanics doi:10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2015.01.004

2. Steele, K.M. and Lee, S.S.M. (2014) Using dynamic musculoskeletal simulation to evaluate altered muscle properties in cerebral palsy. Proceedings of the ASME 2014 Dynamic Systems and Control. V002T16A007.

3. Biewener, A.A., Wakeling, J.M., Lee, S.S.M., Arnold-Rife, A. (2014) Validation of Hill-type muscle models in relation to neuromuscular recruitment and force-velocity properties: predicting patterns of in vivo muscle force. Integrative and Comparative Biology 54(6):1072-1083.

4. Lee, S.S.M., de Boef Miara, M., Arnold-Rife, A., Biewener, A.A., Wakeling, J.M. (2013) Accuracy of gastrocnemius forces in walking and running goats predicted by one element and two-element Hill-type models. Journal of Biomechanics 46:2288-2295.

5. Lee, S.S.M., de Boef Miara, M., Arnold-Rife, A., Biewener, A.A., Wakeling, J.M. (2012) Recruitment of faster motor units is associated with greater rates of fascicle strain and rapid changes in muscle force during locomotion. Journal of Experimental Biology 216: 198-207.

6. Lee, S.S.M., Piazza, S.J. (2012) Correlation between plantarflexor moment arm and preferred gait velocity in slower elderly men. Journal of Biomechanics, 45: 1601-1606.

7. Wakeling, J.M., Lee, S.S.M., de Boef Miara, M., Arnold-Rife, A., Biewener, A.A. (2012) A muscle’s force depends on the recruitment patterns of its fibres. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 40(8): 1708-1720.

8. Lee, S.S.M., de Boef Miara, M., Arnold-Rife, A., Biewener, A.A., Wakeling, J.M. (2011) EMG analysis for determining the timing and level of activation in different motor units. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 21:557-565.

9. Wakeling, J.M. and Lee, S.S.M. (2011) Modelling muscle forces: from scaled fibres to physiological task-groups. Procedia International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Symposium on Human Body Dynamics, 2:317-226.

10. Wakeling, J.M., Blake, O.M., Wong, I., Rana, M., Lee, S.S.M. (2011) Movement mechanics as a determinate of muscle structure, recruitment and coordination. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 366(1570): 1554-1564.

11. Lee, S.S.M., Piazza, S.J. (2009) Built for speed: musculoskeletal structure and sprinting ability. Journal of Experimental Biology, 212(22): 3700-3707.

12. Lee, S.S.M., Piazza, S.J. (2008) In vivo measurement of the inversion-eversion moment arms of gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior. Journal of Biomechanics, 41(16): 3366-3370.

13. Lee, S.S.M., Lewis, G., Piazza, S.J. (2008) An algorithm for automated analysis of ultrasound images to measure tendon excursion in vivo. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 24(1): 76-82.