Tresch, Matthew, PhD

Information

Name

Tresch, Matthew, PhD

Title

Assistant Professor

Email

m-tresch@northwestern.edu

Office Phone

312-503-1373

Department

Biomedical Engineering

Office

Ward 5-198 Chicago

Areas of Research

Motor Control, Movement & Rehabilitation, Neurobiology of Disease

NU Scholar Profile

http://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/expert.asp?u_id=2436

Recent Publications on PubMed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Tresch%2C%20Matthew%5BFull%20Author%20Name%5D&cmd=DetailsSearch

Current Research

Current Research

Research in our lab focuses on the mechanisms and strategies responsible for the coordination of movement by spinal motor systems. We examine these issues by using a range of neurophysiological, behavioral, and computational approaches, attempting to integrate between investigations across a number of different levels of analysis and obtain a holistic understanding of spinal cord function.

There are several reasons for why the spinal cord is an especially exciting model to examine basic issues of motor coordination. The most obvious and fundamental reason is its critical role in the production of movement. This importance is clear from the profound loss of function following spinal cord injury, and an important goal of our research is to provide information that might help guide rehabilitation and regeneration strategies. Second, spinal motor systems make significant contributions to the production of movement, and are not simple passive conduits of commands from higher brain areas. Finally, the spinal cord can be studied using a range of different experimental techniques and preparations. These include both in vitro preparations, allowing for detailed neurophysiological investigations, and in vivo preparations, allowing for investigations of higher level aspects of behavior.

It is our hope that by exploiting these advantages, we can come to a better understanding of the role of this critical structure within the neural control of movement, as well as providing insights into the more general process of motor coordination.