Makhsous, Mohsen, PhD

Information

Name

Makhsous, Mohsen, PhD

Title

Assistant Professor

Email

m-makhsous2@northwestern.edu

Office Phone

312-503-0073

Office Fax

312-908-0741

Department

Physical Therapy and Human Movement Sciences; Director, Sitting Biomechanics Lab, SMPP/RIC

Office

645 N Michigan Ave., Suite 1100 Chicago

Website

http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/nupthms/faculty/makhsous.html
http://www.ric.org/aboutus/people/doctors/results.aspx?doctorID=90

Areas of Research

Movement & Rehabilitation

Training Grants

Neurobiology of Information Storage Training Program (NISTP)

NU Scholar Profile

http://www.scholars.northwestern.edu/expert.asp?u_id=1489

Recent Publications on PubMed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Makhsous%2C%20Mohsen%5BFull%20Author%20Name%5D&cmd=DetailsSearch

Current Research

Current Research

We use animal models as well as patients with limited mobility to investigate the physiological responses of the human body to extended periods of sitting. The research focuses on seeking solutions for tissue breakdown for SCI patients through the prevention and early detection of pressure ulcers in wheelchair users.

The Laboratory for Tissue Injury and Imaging conducts studies closely linked to the clinical problem of pressure induced soft tissue injury, commonly seen as a pressure sore in individuals with SCI. Deep tissue injury (DTI) from the unrelieved pressure is a kind of aggressive tissue injury which starts from deep muscle under the intact skin. It is not visually obvious before it breaks up to an open full-thickness wound. Some of the basic facts of using molecular biomarkers that are released during skeletal muscle injury are being investigated in our lab on a validated rat SCI-DTI model to detect and assess early stage DTI. We also performed finite-element simulation studies elucidating the mechanisms of DTI formation in the vicinity of the bony prominence of ischical tuberosity. Based on this understanding, an individualized pressure relief protocol and its associated seating system has been developed and evaluated for its effectiveness in relieving concentrated sitting pressure and promoting healing process of existing pressure ulcers in individuals with SCI.