Perreault, Eric, PhD

Information

Name

Perreault, Eric, PhD

Title

Professor

Email

e-perreault@northwestern.edu

Office Phone

312-238-2226

Office Fax

312-238-2208

Department

Biomedical Engineering

Office

RIC 1403 Chicago

Areas of Research

Motor Control, Movement & Rehabilitation

NU Scholar Profile

https://northwestern.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/07b48479-c3a7-4d91-aca5-cc16993a239b

Recent Publications on PubMed

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Perreault%2C%20Eric%5BFull%20Author%20Name%5D&cmd=DetailsSearch

Current Research

Current Research

<strong>Spinal Control of Movement, Muscle Physiology, Biomechanics</strong>
My research focuses on the multi-joint control of movement and posture in able-bodied individuals and individuals with neuromotor pathologies. Specifically, I am interested in understanding the relative roles of intrinsic muscle properties, limb geometry and neural activation in the control of whole limb mechanics. Generating voluntary movements and interacting with our physical environment is fundamental to carrying out the tasks of daily living, as evidenced by the severe limitations that beset those with movement disorders. Due to its importance, there is a long history of movement-related research, though few studies have attempted to understand the interactions between muscle properties, limb geometry and neural control. Because each of these systems contributes to the functional capabilities of a limb, the relative importance of each is best understood in the context of how these systems interact during typical motor tasks. Therefore, my research plan has three interdependent components: examining the role of muscle properties in the neural control of movement; determining how individual muscles contribute to whole limb biomechanics in the 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) relevant to functional tasks; and evaluating how spinal reflexes coordinate the actions of the multiple muscles within a limb. Understanding the functional interdependence of these often separately studied systems is critical to developing effective rehabilitative strategies for restoring motor function when one or more of these systems is compromised.